Sofia Imber El Tiempo

 

Evaluating Lucas Posada, (“Luquita” to me) is a responsibility that I have avoided till now, because the first thing made manifest by “Luquita” is that he is different, not out of extravagance, but because I think he is possessed by a spirituality so profound that it embodies him, becomes palpable, one can feel it, it projects and definitely makes him someone different, consummate.
During our brief encounter in Santa Fé of Bogotá,  city to which I am bound by deep affectionate and professional ties, he invited me to his house in the country. I am happily familiar with “Luquita’s” habitat, his horses, the good and hardworking people who keep him company, and I also had the pleasure of embracing Ana, his mother, whose cooking, “Anita’s cooking” , is famous in that city. Then, I sensed the emotion of this woman when, like all women of all races, mothers of all children, she confided to me with quiet pride that her son paints. When I asked “Luquita” to see his work, his answer, due to his candid and sober shyness,  was to postpone it for another occasion; “Sofilinda”, as he usually calls me…after, later, the day after tomorrow…I’ll show you my paintings, he said.
In a beautifully sensitive exchange, which we have since then prolonged and converted into an intense correspondence of letters and painted cards, we have touched upon many different topics, but mainly on art and the difficulties of creation.
“Luquita” makes demands upon himself in the exercise of the arts, he commits himself and masters a rigorous craftsmanship and a clear awareness of the responsibility inherent to creation. That is the extraordinary reason why, when he asked me to write a few words, I begged him to let me see his, “Luquita’s” words become poetry, esthetic viewpoints that he sets forth with his whole self and that he complements with something else I deeply admire, his unavoidable sense of duty and loyalty to life and creativity, as the true gentleman of Santa Fé de Bogotá that he is.

Sofía Imber.