LUCAS POSADA’S POST-IMPRESSIONISM

 


LUCAS POSADA’S POST-IMPRESSIONISM AB-SORBING THE PICTORIAL EXPERIENCES
 
OF THE SECOND HALF OF THE XIXth CENTURY AS HE JUMPED FROM  A CANOE
 
TO A HAMMOCK IN A HUT ANYWHERE UNDER THE INCANDESCENT SUN OF THE TROPICS
 
OR IN THE CRUEL COLD OF THE CUTTING NORTHERN STALACTITES

It is said that when Gauguin amongst his friends who were to be the NABIS IN A CLEARING IN THE BOIS D’AMOUR pointing to a tree asked them: What color is that Green tree? Do you see it green? Well paint it the richest green possible in your palette, and do you see the Blue shadows? Well paint them the most violent blue you can find, and the dogs pink, and the christs yellow, and the earth red, and the women bronze and of the most beautiful gold that shines in the land of El Dorado. Lucas dips the tip of the brush in the color and with swift application leaves traces of pigment on flat surfaces or texturized areas of pure color enclosing them with the strokes Rouault in the wake of his stained-glass teacher had made in his youth and that Lucas on the premise of this beneficiary influence in his development prsents with calm expressionism in which the figure and the background merge telling us that all things are one in nature as was understood by the hut dwellers who loved in the hammocks and traveled in the canoes under the magnificent sunsets that nei²ther Gauguin nor Isaacs would forget for centuries to come.
The obsession of this Lucas of Amaraca not a Cranach is divisionism, the light filtering through the thicket, as he continues to dip the tip of his brush in color like some Aguirre lost on a raft circling like a dervish trying, as in the vortex of a whirl on the waters or on the earth, to penetrate the depths with those figures that fade into the surface anywhere on the canvass, or is it on the earth?  

Leonel Góngora
Pelham, February 26, 1992